Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole).
 
 
 
Photo: 06/16/11, 11 am.


We have plenty of these common lizards in our yard and on occasions in our living room which seems to attract them magically. This is the green anole (Anolis carolinensis). They can drop (and regrow) their tail to evade predators. I wonder whether the darker grayish tail of the left fellow is due to such an event. They also change color to fit the situation. Brown indicates distress. They eat small insects such as moths and crickets. 
 
 
wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolina_anole
wildflorida.com:
http://www.wildflorida.com/florida_lizards.php


Coluber constrictor priapus (Southern Black Racer).
 
 
 
Size: approx. 600 mm. Photo: 04/08/12, noon.


This snake surprised me while I was looking for insects in my beautiful jasmine-covered trellis. It seems to be a Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus). They can reach a length of over 60 inches and feed on rodents, frogs, birds, and lizards. They kill they prey by suffocation or crushing. This snake held itself in the jasmine at a height of approx. 6 ft. and did not move at all.  
 

 
wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coluber_constrictor_priapus


Elaphe guttata (Corn Snake).
 
 
 
Photo: 04/15/07, 3 pm.


I found this one under my garbage can (twice over 12 years). This could be a corn snake (Elaphe guttata). They reach lengths of up to 6' and are not dangerous to humans, but then again doesn't the venomous copperhead look very similar? 
 
 
wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_snake


Eumeces laticeps (Broadheaded Skink).
 
 
 
Size: approx. 200 mm. Photo: 08/14/11, 1 pm.


more later. 
 


Hemidactylus turcicus (Mediterranean Gecko).
 
 
 
Size: approx. 100-150 mm. Photo: 08/08/11, 11 pm.


The Mediterranean Gecko has sticky toe pads and vertical pupils. Its skin is bumpy/warty. This introduced old-world species is almost completely nocturnal. It is firmly established in Florida and always found close to human developments. Geckos can make squeaking or barking noises. 
 

 
UGA:
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/lizards/hemtur.htm
UF:
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/herpetology/checklist/lizards.htm


Terrapene carolina.
 
 
 
Photo: 05/01/04, 2 pm.


Another very rare visitor who appears somewhat angry about my intrusion. More later.